Great Resource

Recruitment Resources for International Teachers: The long list of things to think about! (Part 1 of 3)

February 15, 2012


There are so many things to think about and search for information about when recruiting.  Why not have all the links you need to reference all in one location?

Recruitment Resources for International Teachers: (Part 1)

Cost of living comparisons between cities: http://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living

Association of American Schools in South America: http://www.aassa.com/ (Annual stateside recruitment fair; AASSA seeks qualified educators to fill positions in private schools located throughout South America. Schools vary in size and offer a predominately U.S. based curriculum)

Association of Christian Schools International: http://www.acsi.org

(Features a searchable database of 750+ current positions at 150 ACSI

member international Christian schools, frequently asked questions about missionary teaching and a free teacher listing service. Email: teachoverseas@acsi.org)

ECIS: http://www.ecis.org

Carney, Sandoe, & Associates: http://www.CarneySandoe.com

Overseas Digest http://overseasdigest.com/index.html

(ISS) International School Services: http://www.iss.edu

INTERNATIONAL OVERSEAS JOBS http://www.escapeartist.com/jobs16/international.htm (Good site on over-seas living)

International Supply Teachers http://teachersonthemove.com/ (the only organisation recruiting specialist teachers for short-term vacancies in international schools.)

Joy jobs: http://joyjobs.com/

(This site seems a bit heavy on the promotional side of things but fun to cruise)

Queens University, Canada:http://educ.queensu.ca/careers/torf.html

(200+ international teachers placed a year)

Search Associates: http://www.search-associates.com/

Teachers On Net: http://www.teachers.on.net/ (Internet Employment hub for Austrailian Independent schools also maintains an international jobs section)

TIE (The International Educator): http://www.tieonline.com

TIE is the newspaper that most leading international schools use to advertize their teaching vacancies; plus personal, school development news about the Int’l network. Most recent issues have over 130 ads placed by int’l schools representing over 2000 open positions. *Also* TIE’s new Vacancy Notification System, through which you can get automatic and instant notice of every vacancy posted in your area(s) of interest. And once you are notified via email and review the ad, you can have a notification of interest sent with ONE CLICK to the school in question, giving them quick and easy access to your resume.

UNI Overseas Placement Service for Educators: http://www.uni.edu/placement/overseas/ (annual UNI Overseas Recruiting Fair held each February/early March.)

For those returning to the states:

Carney, Sandoe, & Associates: http://www.CarneySandoe.com

The Education America Network – http://educationamerica.net – America’s largest online source for education employment opportunities. There are over 20,000 available employment opportunities from 880 employers from all 50 states. There is NO COST to search jobs, post your resume or receive customized employment e-mails.

Southern Teachers http://www.southernteachers.com/

This Agency works with both independent and public schools in the Southeastern United States. The Agency, directed by

7 Elliewood Ave., Suite 2A Charlottesville, VA 22903-2603

Tel 804.295.9122 Fax 804.295.6448

(Taken from the blog article from wwteach.)

Also check out all the comments and information about 1000s of different international schools around the world on International School Community!

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Great Resource

Educators Overseas: International schools definitions (the schools, the students and the teachers)

November 9, 2011


Teach Abroad: International Schools

Educators Overseasrecruits teachers to teach at international schools around the world. If you’ve never heard of an international school, below is a brief introduction.  Information presented here is taken from the Educators Overseas website.

International School Defined

From Argentina to Zimbabwe international schools come in all shapes and sizes. Some schools are non-profit and are affiliated with a embassy (most often British or American). while others are proprietary. Originally established to educate children of expatriates, or “expats”, (diplomats and international business people who have relocated to that country) international schools have become the elite schools of most major cities around the world. International schools now serve not only expats, but K-12 children of prominent host country nationals, or for anyone who can afford the often high tuition rates.

School sizes vary from ten students to hundreds. The class sizes in most international schools are small, with low teacher/student ratios, allowing for more individualized attention. Internationally accredited, most international schools follow a U.S. or British curriculum. Many also implement the International Baccalaureate (IB) program (find out more about the IB program here: www.ibo.org). Whatever the curriculum, international schools offer teachers competitive salaries, excellent facilities, and an outstanding student body.

International School Students

Teaching at international schools is a joy, thanks to the small class sizes and the outstanding students. The students at international schools are generally the children of diplomats, aid workers, and successful business people and tend to be intelligent and highly motivated. For many teachers, the above average students they teach in international schools are one of the best parts of the job.

By their very nature international schools host a diverse and multinational population of students. Around the world U.S. students comprise approximately one third of international school student bodies. Regardless of their nationality, most all students speak excellent English, as the curriculum of the school is taught in English.

International School Teachers

International school curriculum is taught 100% in English, and all teachers speak English at a native fluency level. As such, schools generally recruit teachers from English speaking countries (the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand).

At all schools around the globe teachers are the life blood of the institution. Nowhere is this better understood than at international schools, where teachers become a partner with the parents and school administration for the welfare of the child.

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