Information for Members

ISC’s Job Vacancy Feature Update: Earn Free Premium Membership!

February 20, 2019


Our Job Vacancies feature was launched just over one year ago, but its popularity already exceeds all our expectations. With our members submitting these job vacancies anonymously, each of their submissions helps another teacher find new and interesting positions at international schools worldwide. Every job vacancy submission helps schools around the globe reach new people who might just be the perfect fit for the position.

job vacancy

We would hereby like to thank the ISC Community for all of their 800+ submissions by holding a job vacancy submission promotion. As of 20 February, 2019, the first 10 members to submit a job vacancy will not just get one free week of premium membership (the normal amount of premium membership you get when you submit a job vacancy), but a whole month added to their account (for each job vacancy they submit)!

Submit the job vacancies you know about today and win free premium membership!

Looking at all the submitted job vacancies so far, we would like to share a bit of statistics that we found.

So far 809 job vacancies have been submitted in just over one year.

We have designed the job vacancies page to keep all of the submitted job vacancies all on one page, even if they have expired.  We wanted our members to see which job positions have shown up for a school over time, and how many times a certain job position has shown up over time as well. For example, maybe if the school has just posted about the job position you are looking for last month, that position won’t show up the following month or the following year or two for that matter. Or if the position keeps showing up for a school, one might wonder why that they are consistently having that job available each year. The expired job vacancy postings are clearly marked, so it is clear which ones are active or not.

There have been job postings submitted in a number of countries from around the world:

• Singapore
• India
• Indonesia
• China
• Spain
• Japan
• USA
• Hong Kong
• Italy
• UAE
• Turkey
• Uganda
• Thailand
• Malaysia

and many more…

There have also been job postings submitted for a number of school positions:

• EAL Teacher: Around 58
• Science: Around 55
• Maths: Around 57
• History: Around 7
• Classroom Teacher: Around 37
• PE: Around 18
• Business Teacher: Around 11

and many more…

We are so glad that we have added this feature to our website. If you have a good story of how our posted job vacancies led to you getting an interview and eventually an offer, let us know by writing to us via our Contact Us page.

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Top 10 Lists

8 Helpful Reminders on How to Find Success at an International School Recruitment Fair

December 9, 2016


If you are job-searching this school year, then going to a recruitment fair is definitely on your mind. To keep your mind set on the right path both before and during the fairs, here are 8 helpful reminders on how to find success at an international school recruitment fair:

recruitment fair

1. Keep an open mind – when attending the Fair you will be meeting many different schools at once. Whilst it’s always helpful to have an idea of what you are seeking, it also doesn’t hurt to remain open-minded to options you hadn’t previously considered.

2. Go to the PD Workshops – the feedback we have received from past attendees has been that the PD workshops are well worth attending. It’s a great opportunity to understand better the curriculum, culture and expectations of your potential new school and to connect with other teachers.

3. Get involved – it’s also your chance to shine! You can make sure you get noticed and stand out from the crowd by actively participating in the workshops. It helps to demonstrate your teaching skills.

recruitment fair

4. Prepare some key questions – before the interview stage you will get your chance to meet and greet with various schools and make an initial introduction. You don’t necessarily always have the luxury of time at the Fairs so make sure you have done your research and go ready to maximize your allotted slot.

5. Network – there should be time to mingle and get to know the other teachers, sponsors and schools. The day needs to be broken up a bit from just interview after interview and it helps to make connections in a slightly more relaxed setting sometimes.

6. Shop Around – it makes sense to talk to as many schools as possible to get a good idea of what’s available.

recruitment fair

7. Be Yourself – Give the schools a chance to see who you really are. Honesty is after all, the best policy. You are far more likely to end up in the right school environment and in a positive new role where you can flourish if transparency is respected and championed from the start.

8. Relax – and smile! The Fairs are quite intensive in terms of the amount of interviewing that can take place over those 3 days. A smile can go a long way in contributing to a pleasant Fair environment for everyone.

To learn more about what to expect from the Fairs environment, check out these past attendee experiences.

recruitment fairThis article was submitted to us by Explore CRS.

The team at Explore CRS facilitates a number of different programs to help applicants find teaching opportunities in wider Asia. In addition to posting current vacancies and providing consultation services, they also organize recruitment fairs that match candidates with recruiters actively looking for talent for their schools. Applicants will be interviewed on-site, and at last year’s fair over two-thirds of all attending candidates were offered positions. An added benefit of attending the Fairs is an opportunity to take part in our Professional Development workshops, after which all attendees can receive certification.

They have two upcoming recruitment fairs in Abu Dhabi and Shanghai that you may want to check out if you have considered teaching abroad. The dates are as follows:

Shanghai
January 13th – 15th, 2017

Abu Dhabi
January 19th – 21st, 2017

You can learn more about their recruitment fairs here and see what Explore CRS can offer you in your education or recruitment pursuits.

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Highlighted Articles

Teach Internationally – Opportunities the World Over for Qualified Teachers

April 4, 2012


Tamara Thorpe, a primary teacher from New Plymouth, New Zealand, is one of over 250,000 English-speaking teachers currently working in international schools around the world.

Tamara had always been interested in the idea of working internationally. “And the tax free option was extremely appealing!” she adds. So when a teaching job became available at the Sharm British School in Sharm el Sheikh in Egypt, Tamara grabbed the opportunity. She has since moved to the El Gouna International School which is near to Egypt’s Red Sea. “The first year here was very exciting and different,” says Tamara who is now into her third year of teaching in Egypt. “We teach a version of the UK curriculum. The children are well behaved and there is a great mix of nationalities here. Due to the revolution and changes occurring here, I have seen more Egyptian children enter our international section of the school. The staff are also from all over; the majority from the UK. I am the only Southern Hemisphere teacher on staff.”

Socialising and Exploring…I love it!

Tamara says that most of the friends she has made are work colleagues or are friends of work colleagues. “Socially there are lots of people from different countries which is always interesting,” she says. “I met my fiancé here; he is from Barcelona and lives and owns a company here, so that is a great aspect!” Another great part of living in Egypt for Tamara is the exploring. She describes a recent trip to the desert: “We spent three days on a White Desert Safari. Wow, I absolutely loved it! We had a Toyota Land Cruiser 4×4 and all that desert to explore! We camped in tents, had fires every night, no luxuries as in bathroom facilities but that’s part of the experience! Being a New Zealander, I’ve grown up camping so it was all good for me! I would recommend it to anyone visiting Egypt.

As for recommending teaching in Egypt, Tamara says “Look into the region and the school. Read as much as you can about the country; Lonely Planet is great. Make sure you know exactly what you are getting in to. I found TIC very helpful (Teachers International Consultancy) and will continue to use them for future job searching.”

International teaching jobs – many opportunities

TIC is an organisation that provides free support to teachers who are considering working in an international school. This includes recommending international schools that best suit a teacher’s experience, personality and location preferences. The options for skilled and experienced English-speaking teachers are wide.

With over 6,000 international schools throughout the world, it’s a market much bigger than most people – even those within the education sector – realise. International schools are those that use English as the language for teaching and learning, and they offer an international curriculum. Most typical curricula used are the English National Curriculum, an American curriculum or an international curriculum such as the International Primary Curriculum or the International Baccalaureate. Most international schools are independent, highly respected, well-equipped and skilfully managed employing fully qualified English-speaking teachers from around the world, mainly from the UK, New Zealand and Australia, South Africa, Canada or America. These schools not only attract English-speaking children from expatriate families but also children from the local population; typically the wealthiest of the local families who recognize that an international, English-speaking education opens a lot of career doors for their children. “In fact, international schools are now catering for the richest 5% of the non-English-speaking world,” says Nicholas Brummit, Managing Director of ISC Research, an organisation which supplies data on the world’s international schools and analyses developments in the international schools market.

It’s a market that is developing significantly as ISC figures attest. “There were 2,584 English-medium international schools in 2000,” says Nicholas Brummitt. “By April 2008 that number had grown to 4,827. Currently there are 6,000 international schools and by 2021 we predict that number to be 10, 000,” he says. That means a lot of jobs for  English-speaking teachers and Headteachers and the reason why they’re looking, says Andrew Wigford of Teachers International Consultancy, isn’t just about salary. “In research that TIC carried out recently, the number one reason for teaching overseas was the adventure and the opportunity to travel,” he says. “Every single one of the respondents said that the experience of living and working internationally had enriched them as a person and the vast majority said that the experience had been good for their career too, with 89% saying that it had improved their skills and job opportunities.” Andrew adds: “For Tamara, she’s learnt to work with a new curriculum and she’s gained excellent experience of teaching children from many different countries which will help her significantly with any new job application, both internationally and back home.”

If and when she chooses to move on from El Gouna, Tamara will have plenty of options. There are another 130 international schools currently in Egypt; 69 alone in Cairo. And, according to ISC Research, there are many more further afield. Qatar has 362 international schools and Pakistan has 355, with 307 in India, 218 in Japan and 155 in Thailand.

Advice

So what is the best advice for other teachers considering a move to an international school? “Apply to accredited international schools or schools that are part of respectable organisations such as COBIS, BSME, FOBISSEA and others,” recommends Andrew Wigford. “You can find details of these organisations on the TIC website. If a recruitment organisation is helping you with your search, make sure that they only recommend you to accredited international schools, or that they personally vet non-accredited schools in advance of your interview. Also make sure your cv is up-to-date and well written.  International schools will be looking for strong personal skills as well as teaching experience.  More and more international school interviews are being conducted through Skype so be prepared for this. Make sure you have the correct equipment set up and have practiced communicating through Skype in advance of any interviews. Work through a reputable organization when searching for foreign teaching positions. There are a few unscrupulous owners in some international schools who do not take the appropriate procedures to ensure that foreign teachers have the correct health and safety coverage, visa back-up, or suitable accommodation. Teachers have been known to find themselves in difficult circumstances, sometimes a long way from home. So working with an established organisation to oversee your placement will give you the security you need. If you work with an organisation that is specifically experienced at recruiting for the international school market, they will be able to give you all the advice and expert support that you need and will know – and may well have visited – many of the schools that you are considering. This will help you significantly during your job search. Once you’ve been offered a job, make sure you cross-check all your terms and conditions and know exactly what you will be receiving and when, including any relocation support.  If a recruitment agency is representing you, they will review your contract with you. If you are still considering a job move for this summer, it’s not too late to do something about it. There are still vacancies left. But take action now or you’ll miss the opportunity.”

For more information about teaching opportunities in international schools go to www.findteachingjobsoverseas.com

To read over 3800+ comments and information about working at over 1160+ international schools go to www.internationalschoolcommunity.com

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Great Resource

Great resource: HAYS – Recruiting Experts in Education (International Teaching)

February 5, 2012


Here is a summary of their organization and the services they offer:

Hays plc is the UK’s largest publicly listed recruitment group and a world leader in specialist recruitment.

The International division of Hays Education was founded in 2005. The aim of the division is to provide a first class recruitment service to all British and International Schools. Over the past few years we have grown significantly and now have a considerable portfolio of schools we work with across a number of continents.

Since our conception we have played a huge part in the movement of teachers all over the world. In addition to this, we keep a close eye on the ever-changing face of International schools, so we can continually offer a first class service. Our involvement with organizations such as the BSME enable us to build closer relationships with our schools as well as keep abreast of issues affecting schools globally.

They also have a job vacancy section which can be found here.

TESTIMONIALS

There is no better recommendation than the feedback we receive from schools we have worked with in the past. Read below a selection of comments headteachers have made about the service we provide.

TEACHERS CASE STUDIES

Choosing to embark on an international teaching career is a life changing decision. Whether it is for the first time or tenth time the prospect of a new life in a foreign country can be as daunting as it is exciting. Click on the case studies on the left to share in others teachers frank observations on their own overseas experiences.

FEATURED SCHOOLS

We work with many different schools around the world in their search for the best teachers. Click on our featured school to read more in depth about what to expect when you decide to make that jump into an international teaching career.

They also have a great section of their website describing the different regions that they service: Africa, South East Asia, Europe, Middle East, and South America.

Here is an example of the information they provide on the region of Africa.

Schools in Africa

Many of the schools we work with, started as very small private schools and have evolved considerably over the years, undertaking ambitious programmes of expansion and development. Many now boast superb facilities and offer a fine institute for employment. Schools in Africa reflect the UK year timetable with the man differences being the times school begins and finishes each day. Usually schools in Africa start earlier in the morning and finish early afternoon.

Standard package

The schools offer:

• Flights
• Accommodation
• Medical cover
• Varying salaries
• Other benefits depending on school
(Laptop, Phone, Car and driver etc)

In Northern African countries, such as Sudan many schools offer tax-free salaries and in many of these locations, where there is not a lot to spend your money on, teachers find they are able to save quite a percentage of their salary and also travel in and around Africa.

Other information

Safety is very important and most schools offered secured accommodation and schools. In addition to this, many schools offer secured transport for teachers to easily move about the cities and towns.

Like all international opportunities choosing to teach in Africa is a true-life adventure. Africa is a land whose climate of experience will both humble and enrich you. The land, the people and the culture will be a classroom within themselves and your experience will be come pages of a textbook you will use to teach in the future.

Check out the other information they provide about the other regions here.

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Highlighted Articles

Teachers International Consultancy: Act Now if you Want a Teaching Job Abroad

January 12, 2012


This year there are 280,000 teachers working in international schools around the world. It is estimated that about 10% of these teachers were new to international teaching this year; the busiest year ever for international school recruiting. And for this coming September, the recruitment drive is even greater as current international schools expand and the number of international schools continues to grow.


Berga, Spain

The language for learning in all international schools is English so most teachers come from English-speaking countries, in particular the UK, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada and the USA.

For all the teachers who are considering making this move, there are a number of things they should think about at this stage says Andrew Wigford, Director of Teachers International Consultancy (TIC), a specialist recruitment organisation that helps English-speaking teachers from all over the world find teaching jobs in international schools. “Start your planning now,” says Andrew. “Most international schools begin recruiting for the new academic year in January and February so the more preparation you can do in advance of this, the better.” Here is Andrew’s advice for preparing for an international job search:

· “Consider what regions of the world may suit you best. Think about the cultural differences, accessibility for communicating with and visiting home, travel opportunities, language issues, safety and security, lifestyle potentials or restrictions. What is most important for you?
·  Apply to accredited international schools or schools that are part of respectable organisations such as COBIS, BSME, FOBISSEA and others. You can find details of these organisations on the TIC website. If a recruitment organisation is helping you with your search, make sure that they only recommend you to accredited international schools, or that they personally vet non-accredited schools in advance of your interview.
·  Make sure your cv is up-to-date and well written.  International schools will be looking for strong personal skills as well as teaching experience. You may want to include details of previous foreign travel and other international connections.
·  More and more international school interviews are being conducted through Skype so be prepared for this. Make sure you have the correct equipment set up and have practiced communicating through Skype in advance of any interviews.
· Work through a reputable organization when searching for foreign teaching positions. There are a few unscrupulous owners in some international schools who do not take the appropriate procedures to ensure that foreign teachers have the correct visa back-up, health and safety coverage, or suitable accommodation. Teachers have been known to find themselves in grave difficulty a long way from home. So working with an established organisation to oversee your placement will give you the security you need. If you work with an organisation that is experienced at recruiting for the international school market, they will be able to give you all the advice and expert support that you need and will know – and may well have visited – many of the schools that you are considering. This will help you significantly during your job search.
·  Ensure that the recruitment organisation you work through cross-checks all your terms and conditions once an appointment is offered to give you the peace of mind you need when taking up a new foreign post.”

Andrew says that some of the best advice for teachers considering the possibility of working overseas comes from teachers already there.  Here is feedback from three teachers who TIC placed in international schools last year:

Clare Lauritzen is now teaching primary at St Michael’s International School in Kobe, Japan having moved from the UK. She describes the type of personality that she thinks best suits an international school teacher: “You must enjoy a challenge, be fairly confident and resourceful, be able to bound back when you have a bad day, not take it all personally, and be able to laugh at the oddities, annoyances and differences,” she says.

Malcolm Scriven is in his first year as a Business and Economics teacher at Park House English School in Qatar. He says “Be clear about why you want to teach abroad. If you want to live in an interesting country in the midst of considerable changes then Qatar is a great place to be.”


Budapest, Hungary

And Dulcie Copeland moved this year to The British School of Budapest in Hungary. She says “Find out as much as you can about the school. Read its website and prospectus. Has it got what you are looking for? Does the school reflect your beliefs? Think carefully about the location too. Might you need to return to your home country frequently? Think about how you would do this; look at the cost implications and journey times.”

All three teachers all agree about one thing: “Go for it!” they say.

Teachers International Consultancy provides a free service for teachers, helping them to find the right job in the right international school. For advice on what to consider when thinking about working abroad and teaching internationally visit www.findteachingjobsoverseas.com or call 02920-212-083.

Also, check out www.internationalschoolcommunity.com for the latest comments and information about over 1050 international schools around the world.

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